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quantum inferiority

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quantum computing, quantum programming, quantum networking Ask questions - there are no stupid QC questions, or tell us what you like and why. 23 Servers

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1 Mar 2021
@banbot:matrix.orgBig Bad Bertha the Ban Bot banned @hydepark:privacytools.io@hydepark:privacytools.io (won't follow room rules).08:34:52
@theflyingturtle:matrix.org@theflyingturtle:matrix.org changed their profile picture.09:54:09
@theflyingturtle:matrix.org@theflyingturtle:matrix.org
In reply to @duos:privacytools.io
I'd your background in physics? Do you want to be involved in the hardware or software?
Software
12:07:00
@duos:privacytools.ioduosroku I would play around with the IBM Quantum Experience https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/docs/ You can use a simulated quantum computer to practice and submit jobs with the algorithms you write and then run them on real machines too! You can even export the whole algorithm in python qskit I think. 14:17:14
@duos:privacytools.ioduos* roku I would play around with the IBM Quantum Experience https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/docs/ You can use a simulated quantum computer to practice and submit jobs with the algorithms you right and then run them on real machines too! You can even export the whole algorithm in python qskit I think. 14:17:47
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp
In reply to @duos:privacytools.io
What do you mean?
for the basic physics, the book by Nielsen and Chuang is still a good source (though the examples of algorithms and error/correcting codes are limited to those known at the time). The lecture notes of John Preskill and John Watrous are available online and also a good reference. A fairly recent review of quantum algorithms is Montanaro, npj quantum information 2, 15023 (2016) (it's open access). An almost comprehensive list of algorithms is at http://quantumalgorithmzoo.org
16:34:26
@duos:privacytools.ioduos* roku I would play around with the IBM Quantum Experience https://quantum-computing.ibm.com/docs/ You can use a simulated quantum computer to practice and submit jobs with the algorithms you write and then run them on real machines too! You can even export the whole algorithm in python qskit I think. 17:38:32
@theflyingturtle:matrix.org@theflyingturtle:matrix.org
In reply to @qcomp:matrix.org
for the basic physics, the book by Nielsen and Chuang is still a good source (though the examples of algorithms and error/correcting codes are limited to those known at the time). The lecture notes of John Preskill and John Watrous are available online and also a good reference. A fairly recent review of quantum algorithms is Montanaro, npj quantum information 2, 15023 (2016) (it's open access). An almost comprehensive list of algorithms is at http://quantumalgorithmzoo.org
Thank you so much! I am grateful to all of you helping out..
17:57:40
@pedrojmatos:matrix.orgPedro MatosI'm also starting and currently following the "Quantum Processes Systems and Information" by Schumacher to learn the basics of Quantum information. It has many simple examples and has plenty of exercises.19:28:58
@1ethanhansen:matrix.org1ethanhansenAnyone here have an opinion on how big of a deal this is? https://phys.org/news/2021-02-entangled-qubit-states-channel.html19:59:48
2 Mar 2021
@theflyingturtle:matrix.org@theflyingturtle:matrix.org changed their profile picture.06:37:22
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp
In reply to 1ethanhansen
Anyone here have an opinion on how big of a deal this is? https://phys.org/news/2021-02-entangled-qubit-states-channel.html
In my view it's a nice experiment and important, but gradual progress for the superconducting implementation of QIP. As I read it, the main advance over previous experiments (some by the same group) is the achieved fidelity and the fact that the two nodes that are entangled are (small) quantum registers, which allows to generate and verify an entangled state of 3+3 qubits. But it's all in a single fridge, not really long-distance. I find the title of the press release somewhat misleading: entanglement has long been distributed via "communication channels" (with optical or infrared photons via air or optical fibres over 100km). The work by Zhong et al is (i) in the microwave regime, (ii) achieves deterministic distribution to stationary qubits that allow further processing and thus (iii) helps clearing the path to new multi-chip architectures using superconducting qubits.
09:23:42
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp* In my view it's a nice experiment and important, but gradual progress for the superconducting implementation of QIP. As I read it, the main advance over previous experiments (some by the same group) is the achieved fidelity and the fact that the two nodes that are entangled are (small) quantum registers, which allows to generate and verify an entangled state of 3+3 qubits. But it's all in a single fridge, not really long-distance. I find the title of the press release somewhat misleading: entanglement has long been distributed via "communication channels" (with optical or infrared photons via air or optical fibres over 100km). The work by Zhong et al is (i) in the microwave regime, (ii) achieves deterministic distribution to stationary qubits that allow further processing and thus (iii) helps clearing the path to new multi-chip architectures using superconducting qubits.09:49:18
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp* In my view it's a nice experiment and important, but gradual progress for the superconducting implementation of QIP. As I read it, the main advance over previous experiments (some by the same group) is the achieved fidelity and the fact that the two nodes that are entangled are (small) quantum registers, which allows to generate and verify an entangled state of 3+3 qubits. But it's all in a single fridge, not really long-distance. I find the title of the press release somewhat misleading: entanglement has long been distributed via "communication channels" (with optical or infrared photons via air or optical fibres over 100km). The work by Zhong et al is (i) in the microwave regime, (ii) achieves deterministic distribution to stationary qubits that allow further processing and thus (iii) helps clearing the path to new multi-chip architectures using superconducting qubits.09:50:05
@solocollective:matrix.orgsolo changed their profile picture.11:06:33
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelleI should really avoid sharing my uninformed opinion given my poor understanding of physics, but I'm curious to learn more. Why are they using superconducting qubits for this? That does seem to preclude using this for actual networking unless it's a quantum LAN, right? I guess I just need some ELI521:38:04
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp
In reply to @michelle:privacytools.io
I should really avoid sharing my uninformed opinion given my poor understanding of physics, but I'm curious to learn more. Why are they using superconducting qubits for this? That does seem to preclude using this for actual networking unless it's a quantum LAN, right? I guess I just need some ELI5
I'm neither experimentalist nor expert on superconducting subitems, but I think that this gives more flexibility to wire up qubits within one device. E.g., one can do gates on 'distant' qubits, which reduces overhead compared to the case where only spatially close qubits can interact. I agree with you that it' unlikely to be used for communication: the procedure used to couple the qubits does not scale and microwave photons don't look like a good choice for that purpose.
23:16:30
3 Mar 2021
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelleSo perhaps it's more appropriate to think of the potential for this as being analogous to a data bus in conventional computer architecture? 01:08:47
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelleMaybe for use within data centers? There was some company talking about building quantum data centers. Sounds premature to me. I think we need to figure out the simple stuff first before building supercomputing clusters or whatnot. 01:10:39
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelleBesides if these are better suited to be co-processors alongside their conventional counterparts, then why have bunches of them in use?01:11:56
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelle** bunches of them in a tightly coupled architecture01:12:28
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@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp
In reply to @michelle:privacytools.io
So perhaps it's more appropriate to think of the potential for this as being analogous to a data bus in conventional computer architecture?
Yes, that's my view, too. Even an 'on chip' data bus. It's still open how to go from the <100 qubits we have now thousands and millions. Any method that allows to reliably connect non-adjacent qubits gives more possibilities and could be valuable.
11:15:55
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7 Mar 2021
@michelle:privacytools.io@michelleWhat does the hive mind think about this article? I was surprised, since I've gotten so jaded reading so much absolute drivel and fear-mongering around quantum computers and cryptocurrency. Best one I've come across in a while. https://medium.com/iovlabs-innovation-stories/post-quantum-cryptography-e48c2e54967b01:43:21
3 Mar 2021
@solocollective:matrix.orgsolo changed their display name from solocollective to solo.20:16:14
9 Mar 2021
@duos:privacytools.ioduosAnyone seen this, thoughts? https://physicstoday.scitation.org/do/10.1063/PT.6.1.20210305a/full/04:08:18
4 Mar 2021
@qcomp:matrix.orgqcomp
In reply to @theflyingturtle:matrix.org
Hey everyone I'm totally new in quantum computing. Just about to start could you helpe with how to get started...
Today there's a helpful article in Nature titled 'How to get started in quantum computing' (Nature 591, 166) with pointers to many resources.
11:33:05

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